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Monday, December 10, 2007

How You Can Make Better Decisions in Life

Ken marched to his own beat. He never listened to anyone, not his parents or his teachers. Ken's motto was "I do it my own way." As a consequence, Ken's life was a series of bad decisions. He was unsuccessful in life. Nevertheless, Ken's decision making never got any better. As the county guard shut the door to Ken's cell, he ordered, "Lights out!" Ken screamed, "I'm the man! You can't make me do anything." The prison light went out. Ken is left in the dark.

The Big Decision

Have you ever wondered why some people continue to make bad decisions? You see million-dollar celebrities doing it. You can see this action in government officials and business leaders. There are no discriminators. From the very rich to the poorest of the poor, we see people caught in a vicious cycle of bad decision making. Sadly, we see it much closer than that. We witness relatives making those bad decisions. Despite all the wise counsel, the poor decisions continue.

Why is it important to teach people how to make better decisions? Anthony Robbins, author of Awakening the Giant Within, attributes good decision-making as a key attribute to a happy life. Bestselling author Brian Tracy argues, "The further you think into the future, the better decisions you will make in the present to assure that future becomes a reality." Making better decisions improves the quality of one's life.

The Problem

As a young advisor and college professor, I constantly hear students proclaim, "I'm grown." This statement implies I don't have to listen to anyone. I know best. Therefore, I can make my own decisions. Through series after series of bad decisions, the youth continues on merry ride of worsening consequences. Two things generally can stop this dead-end trap.

One lies in becoming more mature with age, and the other is experience. In going through a series of bad decisions, a wise person gains insight on the consequences of a bad decision. Every person, regardless of their background or social standing, can benefit from good decision-making techniques. Here are some methods to use:

  • Define the problem or issues
  • Conduct research on the matter
  • Discuss with respected individuals with similar circumstances
  • Consider at least two alternatives
  • Select best decisions, based on your value system
  • Move on and accept any consequences

The Path Forward

Making the right decision is a difficult process. No one will usually applaud your many good decisions; however, you will probably catch heat over the bad ones. Les Brown, author of How to Become the Person You Always Wanted to Be-No Matter What the Obstacle, explains, "Your values are not set by government or church leaders. Your values give you consistency in the way you approach life…By holding to your beliefs, you can always stay on track toward your dreams."

Daryl and Estraletta Green provide personal advice all around the country. Daryl is the author of two books, Awakening the Talents Within and My Cup Runneth Over. They have been noted and quoted in such media organizations such as USA Today, NBC's Alive at Five, Heaven 600, Answerline, American Urban Radio, The Bev Smith Show, The Hallerin Hill Show, Ebony Magazine, and BET's Buy the Book. The Green's nationally syndicated column, FamilyVision, reached 200 newspapers and over 12 million readers.

To get a free one hour personal coaching session, you can contact them at http://www.darylandestraletta.com

 

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